Sunday, October 26, 2014

Reviewing My Own Books, Part One: To Travel Hopelessly

Recently while on vacation in Marmaris with the GF (ass pictures coming later) I took the opportunity to sit down and beach-read my own book TO TRAVEL HOPELESSLY, which was the second of the books that I published on Amazon KDP in 2011.

(The original cover from 2011)

It was not in fact based on blog entries, as the occasional reviewer has said, but in fact on 2000-word stories that I put on dedicated pages on my original English Teacher X website back in 2003, the (pretty embarrasing) remains of which can still be seen there. The stories did get quite a bit of much-needed editing in 2011, though, and a fair bit of stuff was added -- especially in the chapters about Prague, and of course the story about me spraining the kid's arm in class in Phuket.

THE BAD

It has always been the book that I'm least satisfied with, in general -- at 50,000 words it just seems too short to accurately reflect those five years of my life. (To that end I went back and added a couple of chapters last year -- the part about my mentor in Bangkok and a lengthy description of Nana Plaza.)

In addition I felt like the voice of it was not really very distinct -- not sure whether it was light and David Sedaris-like or dark and edgy and Bukowskian.

Also, as reviewers like Matt Forney pointed out -- it's not really a novel, it's just a collection of stories. They're in chronological order, more or less, but you can see the cracks -- the part about Korea has three different stories ending with me about to leave Korea.

I wanted to chop all the stories up into small bits and rearrange them -- as I pretty much did with VODKABERG -- but I was in a rush to get it published just to see what would happen, and the editor liked the book a great deal as it was.

There's a lot of telling rather than showing there, also -- plenty of inner monologues and rationalizations -- and some dorky narrative tricks like referring to myself in the third person. (I wanted to cut all of those out but the editor kind of liked them. I believe all or most of these stories were written before I'd ever heard of Tucker Max so I wasn't emulating him in that aspect. I'm not sure where I picked that up.)




THE GOOD

But all in all I enjoyed it more than I thought I would. There are some entertainingly lurid (if perhaps a bit overblown) descriptions -- I thought the part where I was projectile vomiting on a rooftop in Bangkok was especially evocative -- and lines like "the sky was aflame like an infected asscrack" leap cheerfully off the page. It is definitely the voice of a young X -- energetic and observant, but of course not nearly as smart as he thinks he is. You can see the writer's voice developing in the book -- the part "Two Hairy Months in Bangkok" where Q comes to visit -- that was more a foreshadowing of the way I wanted to write, and did write, in VODKABERG.

Another plus is that the book is tightly focused on the main things I wanted to write about -- the shitty schools, the wacky teachers, and the English groupies in the various pre-Internet, largely pre-globalism cities of Asia and Eastern Europe. Not much flab, and it really zips right along -- I finished it in a couple of hours.

THE CLASSIC

And another reason I found it interesting -- as a period piece. I mean, it was damn near 20 years ago. As one reviewer said -- "a time before the internet when home wasn't just an email away." The prices kind of amuse in retrospect -- sub-$100 apartments in Prague and Bangkok, for example. I fly from Istanbul to Bangkok round trip for $400 at one point, and mention a $4 cup of coffee in Seoul in a way suggesting it was terribly expensive.

IN SUM

So I can safely say it's a funny brisk little read, and although I feel like it could be better, if I changed it it also probably wouldn't be as light and funny and brisk anymore.

I might experiment with re-writing it, or at least adding some stuff, as there's a lot more to say, but I suspect I'll just leave it be. Books take on kind of a life of their own after you write them -- maybe they're not quite what you imagined them to be, but they definitely take on an identity and, like children, don't deserve to be chopped up and put back together again just because they're not quite what you had wanted.

You can read some other bloggers' reviews of TO TRAVEL HOPELESSLY at these links:
Review on 30 DAYS TO X  /  Review on HOT PINK PASSPORT (!)
Review on MATTFORNEY.COM  / Review on ROOSHV.COM
Review on USINGENGLISH / Review on DOYOUSPEAKPOLISH



Buy it as an e-book at :

Amazon US / Amazon UK / Amazon CA
Smashwords / Kobo / Barnes and Noble / iTunes

Buy it as a paperback at:

Amazon US / Amazon UKCreatespace

Buy it in pdf and epub format directly using Paypal:

Add to Cart




Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Interview with English Teacher F, the Old China Hand


Been a while since I did an interview, so here's one. Mostly concerning the Magic Kingdom of China and teaching other subjects besides EFL abroad. English Teacher F also maintains a website with cartoons at www.laowaicomics.com


ETX: How long have you been teaching, and where? 


ETF: For the best part of six years now. Mostly in China, in a few different cities, but I was in Thailand for a year as well. I much prefer China, for a variety of reasons, although like most expats here I'm starting to get chinaed out.

What kind of qualifications do you have? 

A BSc, a TESOL, a beautiful pinkish white skin, and a pulse.

Why did you choose to begin teaching English? 

I got hooked by the whole travel thing with college summer trips to Thailand and Europe, both in the backpacker scene and doing my own thing off the beaten track. So when graduation time came, I wasn't sure at all what I wanted to be doing with my life, if I should pursue a Master's or not, if I should stay in the military or not (I was a weekend warrior throughout school), all that shit. Hell, I STILL don't know. I just knew it would be cool to go take a long trip, the problem is, I had zero $$$. I kept seeing those "Teach English In Asia!!! Get TESOL Certified!!!" happy ads all over campus, so I gave it a shot. I ponied up the $1000, did the course, applied to a bunch of jobs, and got offers from South Korea and China. 

The Korean one was the most tempting, because it paid more, but the Korean embassy didn't wanna issue me a visa because I ain't a native English speaker (yet, they hire British and Australian folks with huge fuckin incomprehensible accents, go figure, but hey it's their country, they can do whatever they want). Besides, I'm glad I came to China, ESL teachers in Korea might make more in entry-level positions but holy hell do they look unhappy and are always bitching.

What do you like / not like about your current position? 

I actually moved out of ESL, and am now teaching a "real" subject in an American high school program. The pay is excellent (almost five times what I made at my college ESL job in 2008-2009), I have way less hours, it's infinitely more stimulating, and it actually holds some decent prospects for future employment. The coworkers are definitely more balanced, more professional and have more direction in their life, although there are obviously some off-the-rails types like in every job abroad, and the students are respectful, friendly, and pretty competent as a group. They definitely show that being from an affluent family and being a self-righteous spoiled brat are not always mutually inclusive, and I'm grateful for that. All in all I have it pretty good, despite the odd misadventure or clash with an incompetent or bullying administrator from time to time.

Who have been your most venal and incompetent employers?  

The company I'm working for right now is very legit, they have headquarters in the US and tons of HR staff that take care of things (when it's easy). 

But before working for them, I was also working as a subject teacher for a school that was just starting. The two owners were two businessmen involved in a myriad of other ventures (hotels, cafés, importing shit, and shady gambling) who thought there could be good money in the international education thingy. They were completely right (look at the demographics in every middle-of-the-pack state college in the US now) BUT you need to invest tons first, of course. They didn't even want to buy books, we had to do with badly photocopied counterfeit shit, they paid us cash (huge bundles of cash, I gotta admit) and despite millions of promises otherwise, never got us proper visas. The two businessmen were always out doing some other shit, and as they couldn't stand each other, there were always internal drama of some sort. 

The guy I was working for before that (at some shitty McEnglish training center I should never have taken) wasn't terrible, he was just a bit of an idiot, and a Confucian bully. I'm glad I broke that contract. Nothing bad to say about my first employers, or those in Thailand I worked for.

Any particularly horrifying stories you'd like to share?  

Well, the two businessmen couldn't get more students to sign up, so the whole thing went tits up. They didn't renew my visa, a few days before the summer holiday (I got a SEVEN DAY visa... basically a notice of deportation) and told me not to come back, through one of their secretaries of course (pussies). I did come back though, after re-routing a bunch of flights, getting a new passport (I was sure they had used some of their ass-licking connections with the government to blacklist me, how paranoid of me), and to their credit, they did give me a pretty juicy severance pay that kept my head above water while I looked for other jobs. Still, the whole experience made me lose a fuckton of sleep, ruined my vacation, cost me a lot of money, and made me more wary of deceitful and lying pieces of shit in the industry (which might be a good thing).

Oh and at the McEnglish job before that, they did give me a pretty sweet brand new apartment... but with a roommate. Shit wasn't in the contract. I don't mind roommates, but I do mind it when the said roommate is pretty much the picture perfect middle-aged bloated alcoholic. He also hated my guts, thankfully, and moved out to go live in one of the shitty apartments closer to the school with another teacher who hated me, leaving the pimp-pad for me alone. So I won the war without even fighting a single battle. 

What are your plans for the future? 

Hell if I know... I'm entering the second third of my life, I'm healthy, have money saved, and a decent resumé despite a lack of teaching credentials. But all my friends back home have cars and houses and shit, while I have... a backpack I guess? And a pirated PS3... I get nagging thoughts of repatriation from time too time, that I try to drown with cheap Chinese booze.

Even though I have it good here, as previously mentioned, I'm getting restless. Next year will most likely be spent traveling around. Going to parts of Asia I haven't been to yet, Australia, the US West Coast, Christmas with the family (first time since 2007) and then 5-6 solid months in South America. The goal is to kill that whole travel bug for good and then see what's up. I might do a Master's of some sort, as unappealing as it is after years of having fun abroad and little responsibilities, or get some proper teaching credz and try to score those lucrative international school jobs.

What's your favorite way to kill ten minutes in class?

Hahahaha... don't have to do that much anymore, now that I'm teaching something with an actual objective. Even in my ESL days I tried to organize my classes somewhat, to make the whole thing less tedious for me.

How's your salary versus the cost of living and your standard of life in general?  

Salaries in China are decent-to-good, and the cost of life is still pretty damn cheap. Apartments can get very expensive in big cities like Shanghai, Guangzhou or Beijing, but are reasonably priced elsewhere. Restaurants and transportation are inexpensive all over the country. So then it becomes a matter of how much you want to spend on entertainment, touristy stuff, clothes, electronics, and how frugal you are in general. I know people who make 5000 yuan and save half, and people who make north of 20k and still can't go out to bars the weekend before paycheck before they're outta funds.

And as for the standard of life, it depends widely on who you ask. Sure, China gives a pretty brutal culture shock (I won't get deep into it, one can just read the millions of blog posts written about the quirky aspects of adjusting to this country) but all in all it's fairly developed, easy to get around, and most importantly, extremely safe. The kind of freedom that foreigners have here when it comes time to be out after dark or going wherever they want is unheard of in Latin America, Africa, or even most US cities. And I gotta say, that's a pretty fucking cool aspect of life here.

Speaking Chinese definitely helps having a semblance of social life here that doesn't revolve around old bitter expats (sometimes a small handful, if in a smaller city) and annoying English-leeches. So many expats come here and stay deeply entrenched in their monolingualism, and then bitch endlessly. Ha. Their loss.


* * *

Speaking of bitter expats bitching, the Kindle Countdown Deal has started for my latest memoir, REQUIEM FOR A VAGABOND. Get it HERE on Amazon. 

Thursday, October 09, 2014

Hot Deals!

I'm having a Kindle Countdown deal on GRAMMAR SLAMMER, my book about how to deal with all those annoying grammar points students pester you with:


It'll be available here on Amazon for 99 cents for a few days, then the price goes up to $1.99 and then $2.99 and so forth. 


Now I'm also trying out my own e-book store at e-junkie (off-putting name though it is, it seems to work well.) I'm offering a special deal there, also, if you haven't read my first two memoirs yet -- you can buy both TO TRAVEL HOPELESSLY and VODKABERG in PDF and EPUB formats for only $5. A savings of,like 20 percent of something. (You have to use Paypal.) 


SPECIAL DEAL -- TO TRAVEL HOPELESSLY + VODKABERG only $5 HERE. 

Add to Cart

And now you can get my latest memoir REQUIEM FOR A VAGABOND as a paperback: 


Buy it HERE as a paperback at Createspace
(Or, of course, you're welcome to get it HERE  on Amazon as an e-book.)

(I would of course be happy to toss in REQUIEM FOR A VAGABOND into the bundle, so you could read the whole Burnout Trilogy, but it is currently enrolled in KDP Select, which means I can't sell it anywhere else other than Amazon. They did in fact block my account once for playing fast and loose with KDP Select, so of course I have to keep my Corporate Overlords happy.)

Monday, September 29, 2014

Big Time!



  • This is it baby! The big time! My latest memoir has reached #3 in SENIOR TRAVEL!

I'd like to thank all the little people, who allowed me to rise to these stupendous heights with appreciation of my awesomeness. 


BUY IT NOW AND LET'S GET ETX TO #1 IN SENIOR TRAVEL!

Get it HERE on Amazon US /  HERE on Amazon UK / Get it HERE on Amazon CA
Get it HERE on Amazon AU

A few songs I listened to while I was writing it, to get you in the proper mood: 











    Wednesday, September 24, 2014

    REQUIEM FOR A VAGABOND Available Now as an E-Book on Amazon

    All right, my latest memoir, the third book in my "burnout trilogy," REQUIEM FOR A VAGABOND is currently available as an e-book on Amazon. It highlights the last five years, most of which I spent in the Middle East, and my Girlfriend Experience.



    Get it HERE on Amazon US /  HERE on Amazon UK / Get it HERE on Amazon CA

    The blurb:

    "A funny thing happened to me, when I moved to the strictest Islamic country on earth, shortly after my 40th birthday, my life stripped of drugs, alcohol and women: I felt happy." 

    In middle age, English Teacher X makes a major life change: He leaves behind a life of debauchery, darkness, drunkenness and devoshki in Russia, and takes a job in the strictest Islamic Kingdom in the Middle East. 

    His life suddenly full of sunshine, sand, sobriety, and an adult-type salary, he also unexpectedly finds himself in a long-distance relationship with a sweet and loyal yet oh-so-stubborn and provincial Russian girl. With plenty of money and a new optimism, finally it seems that a "normal life" is within his grasp... 

    However, things rarely run smoothly in the world according to ETX, and he soon finds himself adrift again, returning for the first time in many years to his homeland, a very troubled, and sick America, with a new career as an independent author of "erotica" and an untoward yet timely interest in survivalism. 

    More alienated than ever and haunted at the image of being the oldest guy in the club or one of the younger guys at the whorehouse, X bounces around exotic destinations (including Cyprus, Costa Rica, and return visits to his old home of Vodkaberg in Russia) and struggles to find a place for himself in a rapidly changing world. 

    But a new high-paying job in the Middle East looms, which might be the best thing that ever happened to him ... or the worst ... 

    Packed with eccentric English teachers of all ages and plenty of sexy-but-difficult Russian women, set against a backdrop of the Arab Spring and the Mayan Apocalypse, X's latest memoir is another dystopian look at the profession of TEFL, expat life, and the myth that travel broadens the mind. 

    WARNING! Contains bad language, graphic content, middle-aged white guy angst, and a complete lack of authentic cultural experiences..


    * * * 

    The beta readers I used were a bit divided in their reaction to this, which is essentially of course focused on getting older. One said he liked it better than VODKABERG in that it was more varied, and that it was my "most optimistic" book, while another found it "considerably more racist and misogynistic" than my other books. Hey, an artist has to grow, right? 

    It's about 100,000 words vs. 50,000 words for my first memoir, TO TRAVEL HOPELESSLY and 120,000 words for my second memoir VODKABERG, and features return appearances by numerous characters from VODKABERG, including Crazy Bob and Pterodactyl Girl (and the city itself.)

    My original plan was to have a middle section with all my backpacking and youthful adventures; that didn't happen, as I ended up writing more about my 2012- 2013 sojourn in America and my friends and family there. The youthful adventures will be a next, separate book, I guess. 

    Despite the author mostly being sober and isolated and / or hitched up the last five years, I hope there are enough whacked-out colleagues and entertaining bad behaviors (mine and other people's) and slutty Russian chicks (a half-dozen or so) in there to hold most people's attention despite the general theme of entropy, failure, impotence, illness, and death.  

    Enjoy!

    (It's on sale now for the full price -- $3.99 -- but I'll be having a countdown promotion the week before Halloween, so if you can wait, you can get it for 99 cents. I'd start it like that now, but Amazon won't let me. You can get it free in that Kindle Unlimited deal, also, And hell if you really can't pony up $3.99 just e-mail me and I'll give you one.)